Dual boot question

I was watching a video about dual booting, and i was wondering about dual booting into ubuntu and still have everything from my garuda. is that possible? i know yall are busy i apreciate any advice

Dual booting is always possible.
It can be a bit tricky, with GRUB, os-prober and all, but much less so with 2 Linux distros.
Just make sure you boot with Garuda’s grub instead of Ubuntu’s, because the other way round can be more difficult. At each update-grub, the os-prober should do its job and recognize Ubuntu.

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when you say about grub, what does that mean? ive seen the term im just not sure what that is? i assume its through the terminal

Grub is probably the most widely used bootloader, adopted by both Garuda and Ubuntu, so added by both of them as part their installation process.
If you already use Garuda, it is the first screen displayed when you boot, with several Lines, Garuda, Garuda Advanced options, etc.
For more details see e.g. the Arch wiki:
https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/GRUB

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oh ok i was wondering about that, thanks for the link ill read up about it

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GRUB=Grand Unified Bootloader. That’s pretty much self-explanatory from there. :slight_smile:

‘LILO’ was easier. :smiley:

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Greetings! I have been using double and triple loading of the System on my computer for about 10 years. This is very good for all occasions. The main disadvantage of double or triple booting or more is restoring Grub after reinstalling Windows or Linux. Even when you install another Linux distribution, for some reason its bootloader does not see the already installed Garuda distribution and, accordingly, does not show it in the boot menu! Therefore, it is necessary to restore the Garuda bootloader with its beautiful screen for selecting a particular System.

Now I use three Systems on my laptop - Garuda Linux, Linux Mint and Windows. But if you can restore the Linux Mint bootloader quite simply and quickly by entering the appropriate commands in the terminal after booting from the installation flash drive of the desired version of Linux. I just couldn’t manage to restore the Garuda boot after installing a different version of the operating system on another logical drive! I’ll describe how I solved this problem in a simple way, which I’m very happy about!

Initially, I split the new ssd disk using the gparted-live-1.5.0-6-amd64.iso boot disk into three equal 60 Gb partitions. Next I installed Windows 11, Linux Mint Mate and Garuda Linux. Accordingly, Grub from Garuda was installed as the last option, and when you restart the computer, you now select the System you need to work with. Now the most important thing…Having fully configured Garuda for ourselves with the installation of the necessary software, we use the boot disk clonezilla-live-3.1.1-27-amd64.iso to make a complete backup copy of Garuda and save it on another logical drive. This backup copy takes up 7.9 Gb for me, which is not so much. But now, when reinstalling a new version of Windows or Linux Mint, you don’t need to reinstall Garuda again!

Simply by booting from the clonezilla-live-3.1.1-27-amd64.iso bootable flash drive, I restore Garuda from the backup copy to the desired disk and within 5-7 minutes you have a working Garuda System in its newly installed and configured form! Yes, to create a multiboot flash drive I use the Ventoy program where I have all my System images for work and installation. This may be a somewhat archaic recovery method, but it is fast and actually works. All the best!


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I like your style dude.

But, do you have to use so many cuss words?

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Yes! I love tuning other people’s brains

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i manage to paritition the hard drive, but it kept saying something about the root. i wasnt sure how to set it up. so i deleted the paritition, i think ill just stick with garuda till i get more familar with the process

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