Beginner Questions

I have been a Linux desktop user for about 15 years (with Fedora then Ubuntu then back to Fedora). When I read about Garuda, I thought I would give it a try. I have a Lenovo Thinkpad x380 Yoga. I have a few questions:

  1. I have my hardisk encrypted and entering the password on boot is kind of ugly and if I mistype it (it is long, after all) I basically have to reboot. Is there a better way to handle this?
  2. I've notice the fan runs alot and at a high rate, which it did not do under Fedora and my battery life is not good with Garuda. I use to get, with significant use about 3 hours under Fedora and now it's under an hour with Garuda. What's going on?
  3. When I try to suspend, I click on "Leave" and instead of taking to the screen will I can select to restart, shut down, etc, the system just shuts down. I don't get any options.

Thanks so much for any advice/guidance you can provide!

Did some more digging and ran HTOP ... (Yea, I know, I should have done it earlier). Seem that /usr/bin/baloo_file_extractor seems to be the culprit. I didn't install this, came with the Garuda system, apparently.

Since this is a new install, should I let it run and if so, will it finish indexing and be quieter there after?

Yeah that sounds indeed like its draining power. It should finish indexing after some time, if it doesnt there is the possibility to disable it in the system settings.

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Is indigenous to Plasma. KDE has made some improvements over the past couple of years, but it can still be problemmattic on some machines. Either kill it in systemd, or wait until it is done indexing. You can also disable it on boot in Settings.

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There is a relevant option for this in System Settings IIRC.

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  1. I have my hardisk encrypted and entering the password on boot is kind of ugly and if I mistype it (it is long, after all) I basically have to reboot. Is there a better way to handle this?

This is (as far as I know) unavoidable with /boot being encrypted.

The pretty password prompts some distros have are possible if /boot is unencrypted (I believe plymouth is the package used to make the boot process including the password prompt attractive)

If /boot is encrypted, Grub2 handles decryption, the downsides of this are that it is (1) substantially slower (2) not very attractive. The upside is that /boot is encrypted and the partition layout is simpler

  1. When I try to suspend, I click on "Leave" and instead of taking to the screen will I can select to restart, shut down, etc, the system just shuts down. I don't get any options.

I had the same issue. I was not able to solve it through any graphical settings I could find. I switched to another widget called "compact shutdown" it works better for me, but it would be nice to learn how to fix the behavior of the stock widget.

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hi. regarding the point No. 2
I would have look what CPU governor is being used. I am guessing that it must be something quite aggressive
CPU frequency scaling - ArchWiki It is true in my case (kernel tkg-MuQSS) but system is mega responsive so I am ok with it.

Check this
https://docs.kde.org/stable5/en/kde-workspace/kcontrol/kcmsmserver/index.html

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By default Garuda runs with the performance-tweaks package installed which is great if you're on a desktop, but if you're on a laptop it murders your battery life.

If you load up Garuda Assistant and then go over to the settings tab you can check the box next to"Enable powersave-tweaks" which will change the settings to something much more friendly to battery life.

Yeah, CPU Governor settings seem to be controlled by which -tweaks package you have installed, so while the Arch wiki is helpful for background, this is one of those Garuda overlay situations that will just keep changing the settings back on you and drive you crazy unless you are aware of the package that's setting the non-standard defaults :wink:

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In my limited experience, Fedora uses the powersave governor and basically does not ramp up the CPU too much. Even my laptop was cool when I tried it. As mentioned above Garuda is setup for desktop. So running it on a laptop requires a couple of things.

  1. Use the vanilla/lts kernel not zen. Zen will overheat your laptop.
  2. Disable performance-tweaks and enable `powersave-tweaks.
  3. Install and start thermald and tlp service.
  4. Install and start auto-cpufreq. This has been a great help in keeping my heat down.
  5. You can try to undervolt wiht intel-undervolt.service if you wanna go that far.

These are what I use on my laptop to keep it from overheating.

Fairly certain its supposed to be a feature.

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